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Rena debris continues to wash ashore

Debris from the stricken container ship Rena continues to wash onto beaches in the Bay of Plenty, even as it is being dismantled.

 
 

New-Zealand ship Rena

DEBRIS from the stricken container ship Rena continues to wash onto beaches in the Bay of Plenty, even as it is being dismantled.

The vessel has been a feature off the North Island’s east coast since in ran aground on Astrolabe Reef on October 5 last year.

Salvage on the wreck began recently, but despite the efforts of salvors , tiny polymer beads continue to cause problems, Fairfax NZ reported.

During August clean-up workers have picked up thousands of the beads, which have largely contributed to the 3.5 tonnes of debris collected during the month.

The small, light beads were found stretched across the Coromandel coast, but clean-up efforts have also being underway on Matakana Island in the Bay of Plenty, Maritime New Zealand (MNZ) said today.

While much of the Coromandel was clear, there were pockets where concentrations of beads were still being found.

The Rena was labelled New Zealand’s worst environmental disaster when the cargo vessel struck the reef, with around 350 tonnes of oil and dozens of containers spilling into the ocean

Salvage workers were now working to dismantle the ship, with the last week proving “highly productive”, MNZ said.

Eighty five individual pieces of steel were removed this week, bringing the total amount of steel removed to 300 tonnes, most of which has come from the Forecastle Deck area.

The Bay of Plenty Regional Council said it was continuing to respond to reports of oil washing up as part of its day to day business.

 
 

 
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