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New Zealand releases list of banned baby names

New Zealand’s Department of Internal Affairs has released the list of names it stopped parents calling their children over the past decade.

 
 

Baby

NEW ZEALAND’S Department of Internal Affairs has released the list of names it stopped parents calling their children over the past decade.

In total 285 named were rejected between July 2001 and September 2012.

The most common rejection was Justice, which came up 60 times, as well as Juztice (1) and Justus (2).

Other names that could be confused with titles and missed the cut were 29 Kings, 27 Princesses, 26 Princes, nine Majors, nine Dukes, and eight Bishops.

Royal was rejected 21 times.

Internal Affairs births, deaths and marriages registrar-general Ross McPherson said no names were specifically banned, but they could not be more that 100 letters long, offensive to a reasonable person, and had to abide by the dictionary definition of a name – that it was a word or a group of words.

Names that could be mistaken for a title would only be allowed if the parents could justify it.

“Sometimes it is pretty simple. ‘Anal’, for example, for most people, is quite offensive,” McPherson told Fairfax NZ.

Others names put forward included a number of single letters such as J (six times), E, T and I (two each), or numbers, including 2nd, 3rd and 5th.

Some names were 99 letters long after the original attempt to give a name with 100 or more letters was rejected.

The most popular names last year were Olivia (312) and Jack (374).

The most commonly declined names of the past decade:
Justice: 60

King: 29

Princess: 27

Prince: 26

Royal: 21

Major: 9

Duke: 9

Bishop: 8

J: 6

Lucifer: 6

 
 

 
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