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Dead tourist’s dad wants more action

THE father of a British tourist who drowned while riverboarding near Queenstown in New Zealand four years ago wants the regulation of the tourism industry sped up.

 
 

THE father of a British tourist who drowned while riverboarding near Queenstown in New Zealand four years ago wants the regulation of the tourism industry sped up.

Emily Jordan’s death in April 2008 sparked a review of the adventure tourism industry and new regulations have been introduced to keep thrillseekers safe.

The industry was previously unregulated, but by November 2014 it will be illegal to operate an adventure tourism business without being audited and registered.

At the end of last month 380 such operators had notified the Department of Labour about who they were and what they were doing – before they undergo a safety audit and are registered.

However, Ms Jordan’s father, Chris, says the changes are taking too long to implement.

“It’s another three years yet before it’s actually fully implemented and that’s only if all the companies that should have registered have voluntarily registered,” he told Radio New Zealand.

Jordan questioned how operators that don’t voluntarily register with the Department of Labour will be chased up.

“People still don’t know how many people are running adventure tourism.”

The Department of Labour couldn’t confirm earlier this month how many operators had yet to notify it.

Prime Minister John Key said on Wednesday the vast majority of New Zealand’s tourism operators were safe and changes have been implemented following the review of the industry.

Mr Key and Labour Minister Kate Wilkinson will attend the launch of the SupportAdventure website, which provides tourism operators with information and advice on safety, in Queenstown on Thursday.

 
 

 
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