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Crumbling Mount Cook – New Zealand’s Highest Peak Shrinks

Ain’t no mountain high enough in New Zealand today as scientists claim that the highest peak in the country has shrunk by some 30 metres.

 
 

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THE most recent report detailing Mount Cook’s dimensions has put the height of the mountain at 3,724 metres, down from 3,754 metres – giving aspiring rock climbers a greater hope of conquering the snowy peaks.

The change comes in the wake of the collapse of a substantial amount of ice and rock back in 1991 – combined with the subsequent erosion which has gradually worn the peak down over the last 20 years. Scientists have spent months pouring over detailed before-and-after photographs in order to calculate the change in height and provide the scientific community with a more accurate measurement.

Spot the Difference

Experts were quick to deny the impact of climate change on the ice cap and instead have suggested that a more general change in the geomorphology of the mountain is to blame. Otago National School of Surveying representative Dr Pascal Sirguey said: “By carefully studying photos taken after the collapse, it appears that there was still a relatively thick ice cap, which was most likely out of balance with the new shape of the summit ridge (and) as a result the ice cap has been subject to erosion over the past 20 years.”

Many climbing expeditions may be slightly disappointed with the new findings, however, Mount Cook still remains New Zealand’s highest peak standing more than 200 metres over its nearest rival Mount Tasman. Anyone wishing to climb the mountains new height might want to consider browsing Voucherbox.co.uk for money saving vouchers covering clothing, equipment, hotels and restaurants. With vouchers for many stores such as Amazon you are sure to save plenty of cash – you will even find money saving coupons for your travel expenses to Mount Cook itself.

So whilst Mount Cook may be just a little less imposing than it was previously, there’s no need to despair. In fact if the mountain is on your list of top travel destinations, you might be happy of the missing 30 metres by the time you reach the summit.

 
 

 
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